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The Mayor's Fund for London

The Mayor's Fund for London empowers young Londoner's from disadvantaged background to acquire the skills and opportunities they need to secure employment, climb the career ladder and escape poverty.

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Creativity Works, our partnership with the Mayor's Fund for London, addresses the problem of youth unemployment in London by engaging young people in the creative arts.

One in six jobs in London are now in creative industries, presenting a significant level of opportunity for young Londoners. At the same time, youth unemployment in the capital remains high, at around 10.7%, the same as the rest of the country.

Creativity Works is a 12-week programme which helps unemployed young Londoners who have been to secondary school in the capital, but are not in employment, education or training. It uses the creative industries to increase confidence, skills and employability, offering personal development projects. Since the programme was launched in 2014, 351 young Londoners have moved into training, education, or employment after completing the Creativity Works programme.

Participants have taken part in projects spanning fashion, product design, outdoor arts, events, media, film and festivals. They have involved a variety of activities, including masterclasses from industry experts like Jean Paul Gaultier, Peter Andre, Alesha Dixon and Jamie Oliver. Alongside this, soft skills training is provided along with live work experience and professional mentoring. Since June 2014, more than 260 Berkeley staff members have volunteered to mentor project participants. 

Through the Mayor's Fund for London we also support Kitchen Social. Kitchen Social provides food to school children during the school holidays. An astonishing 700,000 London children experience food insecurity during holiday periods. Holiday hunger means that many children return to school with an obvious learning and health disadvantage compared to their peers.

Kitchen Social was launched in 2017. Since then, the programme has helped establish 110 community groups to set up hubs across 23 boroughs. Hubs provide not only nutritious meals, but also social activities and a chance to teach young people skills around healthy eating, budgeting, and cooking.

Berkeley Foundation funds 18 hubs across the areas Berkeley operates. Last year, funding from Berkeley Foundation provided more than 7,200 meals to 1,682 children.